Tag Archives: museology

Fans of the Powerhouse Collection

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Italian fan featuring Apollo and Daphne made between 1730-1760 (A5414)Collection: Powerhouse Museum

Italian fan featuring Apollo and Daphne made between 1730-1760 (A5414)Collection: Powerhouse Museum

Looking at ways to house our rich and diverse collection of dress accessories have always been a constant challenge. When an area of the basement store was set aside for the storage of dress and accessories in the early 1980s, we were at the forefront. A quarter of a century later some of the methods that were adopted, now appear tired and in need of attention.
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Gulgong Pioneers Museum Blog

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Gulgong Pioneers Museum. Image courtesy Mudgee tourism

I was contacted late last year by Marie Gorie from the Gulgong Pioneers Museum about a project she was about to undertake. She wanted to re-order the textile store. Maintaining a collection store takes a lot of time and resources and obviously, as the collection grew, some of the maintenance had slipped.
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What does a curator really do in a day?

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Portrait of Min-Jung Kim, Curator of Asian Arts & Design, Powerhouse Museum, Photo by Sotha Bourn

People often ask me what curators do. Usually my answer is “we research, collect, document and display objects.” However, this answer doesn’t seem to satisfy people who wonder what really goes on behind the scenes in the museums and galleries.

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Self-guided walking tour mobile app reviewed

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The release of another self guided walking tour (part one of the new ‘Exploring old Sydney’ series on the Powerhouse Museum walking tours iPhone application) marks a perfect opportunity to critically review how this product has performed to date. For those adverse to detail, key lessons are highlighted in bold.

A significant technical factor in the Museums quick transition from original tour idea to app release has been the My Tours solution. Its use highlights the strengths that a software as a service methodology can offer. In the Galleries, Libraries and Museum (GLAM) sector there is no need (and often budget) to reinvent the wheel for certain digital products. My Tours is an example of a competent package that works well to cover a common GLAM experience like audio tours. Treating ‘software as a service’ gives our curatorial staff the opportunity to focus on the all important content creation aspect of product development.

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At the Frontier of heritage conservation. A report from the Museums Australia Conference, Perth 2011. Part 2

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Toner Stevenson outside the WA State Library.

Written by Toner Stevenson, manager, Sydney Observatory. Only last week Nicholas Serota, Director of the Tate galleries, campaigned against environmentally-damaging conditions in Museums and galleries worldwide. It is true, many museums spend a significant proportion of their budget in keeping galleries at a steady temperature and humidity level. Filtering pollutants and controlling light levels is taken very seriously. Also costs escalate when Museums display loaned artifacts which require even more stringent controls governed by contracts.

Making decisions about whether and how much to cool, heat and de-humidify has been much debated and, with the onus on reducing our carbon footprints and the running costs, the old standards are in question. International Conservation Services (ICS), a private conservation company based in Chatswood, took out this year’s Museums and Galleries National Award for an Australian-based research project titled Development of Guidelines for Environmental Conditions for Museum and Galleries. The presentation of the findings by ICS Director, Julian Bickersteth, considered both human comfort in galleries and the temperature and humidity conditions required for objects made form different materials, looking at the crossover range and suggesting that more flexibility can be tolerated. The new guidelines for the UK (PAS 198) are leading the way and it is timely for Australia to consider its own varied climate, and, argues Bickersteth, set its own guidelines.

The Powerhouse Museum is fortunate to have a highly-skilled Conservation Department who monitor spaces and advise on all the environmental requirements for all exhibitions. At Sydney Observatory we can only keep paper and textiles for a very short time and in a few rooms that have the least fluctuation in temperature and humidity. These new practically-based guidelines will help all Museums and Galleries make better decisions about the storage and display of their collections, guiding reductions in energy waste. .

The Judges Comments: “This project holds great significance for the cultural and heritage sector throughout Australia (arguably the world) as it builds knowledge, skills, understanding and standards for keeping collections safely into the future, both in storage and whilst on display. These guidelines will become the well-thumbed or bookmarked resource that remains on every gallery, library, archive and museum professional’s desk.”

Related reading:
Dialogues for the new century: Discussions on the conservation of cultural heritage in a changing world, 2010.

Australian Institute for the Conservation of cultural materials (AICCM) National Cultural Policy Discussion paper

At the Frontier of interpretation: A report from the Museums Australia Conference, Perth 2011. Part 1

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A portico outside the 'At the Frontier' conference in Perth reads ‘The price of all history is the understanding of Modern Times’. Image Toner Stevenson.

Written by Toner Stevenson, manager Sydney Observatory who recently attended the Museums Australia and Interpretation Australia conference held in the new State Theatre and WA State Library in Perth, 14 to 18 November. There were many frontiers discussed throughout the conference and two themes that I particularly engaged with as being of relevance to the Powerhouse Museum were the new cultural frontier and how technology has impacted heritage conservation. This blog relates to the first theme.
‘Why Culture is Changing’ was the title of the keynote address by Professor John Holden, chair of a thinktank in London called Demos . Holden discussed the revolution that is occurring in the definition of the term ‘culture’. In the past exclusiveness defined culture and decisions were made for the many by the few. There was a gap between culture as selected and presented by the professionals and the home-made. An exciting frontier now exists through technologies which place the tools of creation, selection and ‘curatorship’ in many people’s hands.
Unlike in the era of the Beatles and Rolling Stones access to music recording, production and distribution is available to everyone using ever-more accessible technologies. The rules of the game have changed and there has been an explosion in home-made culture. Holden argued that if ‘making cultural choices goes to the heart of self-identity’ then the providers of cultural content, the muses, must be more important for society and the economy as everyone strives to reach their cultural potential. To engage with this frontier means that Museums have to make content available so it can be manipulated, owned and revealed by the population. This will result in a more democratic culture.
Over the next few days of the conference we explored how communication technologies can democratize culture and add deeper levels of meaning to heritage sites. This included making content available over the internet, using Twitter and Facebook to create dialogues between Museum staff and the public and how Iphone apps can provide deeper interpretation of exhibitions which can be taken away and used at any time by the user. Julian Bickersteth, Director of International Conservation Services, demonstrated, using the Powerhouse Museum Lovelace exhibition app, how smartphones can also collect feedback that creates future opportunities, including mapping behaviour patterns in exhibitions to improve decisions on exhibition interpretation.
This leads me to the second theme of the conference, the frontier Museums are facing to do with prioritising the collection and the conditions in which it is stored and displayed. The challenge is to improve our energy usage, respond to climate change and provide the longterm care of our heritage. I will outline this in more detail in Part 2.

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: Inside the Heath Ledger Theatre of Perth’s new State Theatre, Image Toner Stevenson.

Related reading:
Ivey, Bill (2008). Arts, Inc.: How Greed and Neglect Have Destroyed Our Cultural Rights.

Broken dreams and dioramas

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Photo by Jean-Francois Lanzarone, Powerhouse Museum

A couple of media stories set me thinking about the image of museums. One (which you may well have come across) concerned a museum and its touring exhibition which have gained an extraordinary amount of press. I refer to the Museum of Broken Relationships, founded by a Zagreb couple out of the ruins of their own relationship.

Artist Drazen Grubisic and film producer Olinka Vistica began collecting six years ago when dividing their own possessions. Books and furniture could be divvied up but what about a small wind-up white rabbit, for some reason a token of their former relationship?

The white rabbit became the Museum’s first artefact. It’s been joined by an array of artefacts encompassing the banal (mainly) to the profound and alarming. The collection includes an axe used to smash up an ex-lover’s flat, a teddy with “I love you” on its chest accompanied by a note reading, “I love you. WHAT A LIE! DAMN LIES, DAMN LIES!’ a set of brain scans, a tin of ‘Love incense’ (the label reads: ‘Doesn’t work’), and a red candy g-string.

With this unlikely collection the MOBR has progressed to a permanent and well-visited gallery in Zagreb plus a hugely successful touring show currently packing them in at Covent Garden, London.

Donations and accompanying labels are invited; most of the artefacts need the latter to work. My favourite label (accompanying a frisbee) reads

Darling, should you ever get the ridiculous idea to walk into a cultural institution like a museum for the first time in your life, you’ll remember me.

On one level the MOBR is completely trivial and opportunistic; on another its connection to some of our deepest feelings obviously gives it a strong appeal.

What does its success tell us about museums and their publics? Mainly that a lot of people would like a chance to be Tracey Emin. Or Glenn Close in boiled bunny mode. Or, less cynically, that a combination of voyeurism, interactivity and savvy curatorship is a sure fire winner. And that cultural/moral improvement is not essential to successful exhibitions.

By the way if you have artefacts to donate the MOBR can be contacted here.

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Photography by Jean-Francois Lanzarone, Powerhouse Museum

The other muse-inducing source was a story in the New Yorker about the restoration of the dioramas at the American Museum of Natural History. I don’t much like stuffed animals or skeletons so I haven’t visited this museum or many others of its genre, but dioramas are another matter. For a start they have an interesting history – for example some of the first European views of Sydney were created for dioramas, the travel docos of their day.

More significantly, the Night at the Museum movie franchise (the first edition thereof was set at the American Museum of Natural History) makes it clear that despite decades of change, the diorama and its artefacts remain a powerful part of the museum idea to a lot of people. Sure, if you have to watch Ben Stiller in a museum, it’s obviously going to work better if there are heaps of fake animals and people ready to escape their dioramas after hours.

I’m still not sure if the result is merely further evidence of the cultural irrelevance of contemporary US cinema (the mainstream part, anyway) – why didn’t they put Stiller in a museum which would have him chased by more interesting and various things? The trouble with this argument is that NATM 2 apparently (I haven’t seen it) centres on a battle to save the old dummies from the Smithsonian, where such things aren’t appropriately valued. To inhabitants of the post-Pompidou museum world, it’s a message worth thinking about, even if you don’t like dioramas.

Regional Services Internship: The Manning Valley Museum

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Photography by Marsha Rennie

Manning Valley Historical Society Museum. Photography by Marsha Rennie

The Manning Valley Museum was established in 1964 through the incredible foresight and hard work of local farming women. They literally drove around on the back of a ute from farm to farm calling for locals to empty their sheds! In 1966 the Society moved into what was previously a General Store first established in 1871 by the Duff family in which to house the museum collection. They did not have any museum skills but had a real passion for their community. Today the museum still operates without a Curator and the volunteers are much the same, coming with various experiences to work with a passion for preserving the history and objects within the walls of the old store.

As the textile ‘custodian’ of the Manning Valley Historical Societies Museum, I was delighted to be accepted, along with my colleague Mieke Van Werdt for a Powerhouse Museum Internship. I certainly had no idea what to expect and I was soon to learn the breadth of skills I could acquire and the capacity of a 5-day program to transform every aspect within our Regional museum.

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The art of box making. Photography by Marsha Rennie

The first day brought lessons in paper conservation with Margaret Jurasek. Paper conservation?? What would a textile manager possibly learn from a Paper Conservator? I was impressed to learn the importance of simple sand bags when displaying books and picked up a variety of skills from making mylar mounts and folders to the ‘art’ of box making – not just any lidded box but the hinged, foam lined, cotton tape enclosing, photo labelled type! Necessary skills for a textile volunteer in a low budget regional museum.

Across the room, I met the talented Gosia Dudek who shared with us the magic of building displays using simple ‘pins’, silicon tube and fishing line! She gave me real skills for presenting professional displays securely. Whilst in the conservation lab, we also learnt to absolutely not rub any preparation into our leather and timber objects. This is a revelation for decades of well-meaning volunteers everywhere armed with Mr Sheen or linseed oil!

Range of tools required by Conservators to build displays. Photography by Marsha Rennie

Range of tools required by Conservators to build displays. Photography by Marsha Rennie

In the basement, I not only got to visually feast on the collection but observe real storage solutions for our Manning Valley Museum. This rack on castors would be the ideal answer to our dilemma of storing large garment boxes in our back workroom. It would allow extra storage whilst being able to easily access our permanent shelving too small for garments.

Photography by Marsha Rennie

Photography by Marsha Rennie

Even when not actively engaged in a ‘lesson’ – opportunities to professionally ‘develop’ abounded. Just wandering through the ‘transit’ area and examining the Powerhouse Museum curators wish list items gave me reason to reflect upon our own accessioning choices now and into the future.

Anni Turnbull the Social History Curator, was the fresh set of eyes I needed to immediately see the opportunity to breathe life into our SES exhibit- a corner of our museum that had seemed like just another collection of objects. It was suggested that we dig up old newspaper articles of rescues that had been carried out by the men who had used the equipment.

Photography by Marsha Rennie

Photography by Marsha Rennie

Both Anni and Diana Lorentz explored the undeveloped potential of our museum to represent the story of our buildings history and this was best demonstrated by exploring the Powerhouse’s “What’s in store?” exhibit. Diana and Malcolm McKernan also helped me develop a strategy to highlight significant objects amongst our ‘clutter’, improve our signage and explore the potential for storage to be developed on the exhibit floor itself.

The internship surpassed all expectations. It was a pleasure and an inspiration to meet so many passionate and generous professionals giving freely of their time and knowledge to enhance our humble regional museum.

Marsha Rennie
Manning Valley Historical Society Volunteer

Copies and collections

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Collection: Powerhouse Museum

Erika recently wrote about ‘real vs. fake’ museum objects, using the example of repro fossils as an example. It’s an interesting issue: that museums continue to thrive in the digital age is largely due to their role as repositories of the ‘real’ and ‘authentic’.

But there’s a few interesting qualifications to this claim. One is that the Powerhouse’ ancestor, the Technological Museum, was founded as a museum of applied arts and manufactures – the latter by definition not unique. Another is the long history of copies and reproductions in museum collections. Reproductions of architectural elements and decoration were part of the collection of some the first public museums. As well as artefacts of classical antiquity, both the Altes Museum, Berlin and the John Soane Museum, London, featured casts and copies of classical sculpture and architectural decoration.

These museums were highly influential on the neoclassical architecture of the 1800s. The Powerhouse collection holds many examples of the 1800s fashion for architectural reproductions. Perhaps the outstanding work is the 1870s plaster casts of Lorenzo Ghiberti’s doors for the Baptistry of the Duomo, Florence.

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Collection: Powerhouse Museum

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Collection: Powerhouse Museum

As classicism formed a set of principles and models for architecture and design, there was a sense that all the elements of architecture were copies, embodiments of timeless aesthetic principles. Hence reproductions could be of similar value to the originals, especially for educational purposes. However as twentieth century design placed greater value on originality and individual vision, copies and reproductions began to inhabit the same moral and economic territory as fakes and forgeries.

The decline of classicism as an architectural authority has changed the reasons for this museological practice, but it remains common in various forms. Recently I acquired a reproduction of a mural designed by Douglas Annand in 1948 for a milk bar at Wynyard called Patricia’s. The repro mural was produced for the exhibition Modern Times. We have in the collection Annand’s design for the mural plus a photo of the completed milk bar – hence our model maker Iain Scott-Stevenson was able to create what seems an accurate reproduction of the original mural.

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Photography by Max Dupain. Collection: Powerhouse Museum

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Collection: Powerhouse Museum

Not everyone agrees that contemporary reproductions are worthy of acquisition. I commissioned another architectural repro for the exhibition Visions of a republic: The work of Lucien Henry. Given that almost nothing that Henry designed is still extant, it seemed worth recreating part of the pressed zinc ceiling he designed in 1890 for the Hotel Australia. We had Henry’s designs in the collection and after weeks of searching I managed to find a photo of the ceiling. Finally I was able to borrow some parts of the only other ceiling produced to the same design, at the former George Patterson House, now the Establishment bar on George Street. These parts were used to create moulds for new ceiling panels.

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Collection: Powerhouse Museum

The repro ceiling was commissioned and catalogued as an object in the Museum’s collection, but it was not treated as such during dismantling at the conclusion of the exhibition. There’s no doubt that reproductions – even those created at considerable expense – divide opinion within museums. Perhaps a visit to the John Soane Museum should be prescribed for the doubters.

My escape from Cairo: Egypt’s Uprising and the National Museum

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Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

I have just returned from Cairo after a tumultuous few days caught up in the demonstrations in Egypt. I was meant to be there for 6 weeks undertaking research for my PhD before leading an independent 24-day tour of Egypt, “From Alexandria to Abu Simbel” for Alumni Travel in Sydney. Since I was staying in a hotel located at the epicentre of the protests and demonstrations (adjacent to Midan Tahrir, also known as Liberation Square), I had a unique vantage point and was able to witness everything from the burnt out National Democratic Building to the looted businesses, roaming tanks, armed soldiers and snipers, the looming presence of fighter jets and army helicopters overhead, as well as the waves of peaceful and then potentially dangerous protests. Fortunately, I left before the exchange of Molotov cocktails, stones and other forms of ammunition broke out.

As I am a naturally very curious person with a passion for museums and cultural heritage, I couldn’t resist making a visit (actually, a few visits!) into Midan Tahrir to check on the well-being of Egypt’s national museum of antiquities and to see what was happening with the protests more generally. In this rather extraordinary blog post, I thought I would share with you some of my observations and perhaps also provoke some thought around what the role of a national museum is during an uprising – does it play any part in building and/or maintaining a sense of solidarity and national pride with its people or is the museum made redundant?

Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

As you will see in the photograph above, the Egyptian Museum (the pink building) is located in a very vulnerable position in the heart of Midan Tahrir. To give you some idea of its location in context, behind it is the Ramses Hilton hotel, to the left is the ex-National Democratic Party building and to the far left is the new Ritz-Carlton Hotel (the old Nile Hilton) which is currently under construction. In front of the Museum is the site for what is believed to be a new car park, although it has looked more like a demolition zone for longer than I care to remember!

Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

Above and below is how the Egyptian Museum looked when I made a visit only a few months ago (in November 2010). It’s quite a contrast to what I have just experienced, as you will see! Take particular note of the National Democratic Building behind it.

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Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

The Egyptian Museum was founded by French archaeologist Auguste Mariette in 1858 (it was also Mariette who founded what is today known as the Supreme Council of Antiquities, now subsumed into the Ministry of Antiquities). The initial Museum was located in Bulaq, just outside of Cairo, and moved to its present location in 1902. A new Museum, known as the Grand Egyptian Museum, is currently under construction and due to open not far from the Giza Plateau in 2012-2013. The Museum consists of two floors. Downstairs is a chronological arrangement of artefacts from the Predynastic Period to the Roman Period (upon entry visitors are greeted by the colossal statue of Amenhotep III and his wife Queen Tiye) and upstairs objects are arranged thematically. Some of the best known displays here include the contents of Tutankhamun’s tomb, the Royal Mummy and animal mummy rooms and the royal finds from Tanis.

Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

What first struck me when looking at the Museum was the vast number of armed guards stationed in the Museum’s courtyard and on the roof. Each guard was equipped with an automatic rifle and bayonet and their faces were eerily disguised with visored helmets. Normally, the Museum’s courtyard is bustling with tourists taking happy snaps, but on this occasion, they were conspicuously absent. Also conspicuously absent were the many coaches and taxis which typically pull up outside the Museum. These were replaced with tanks, army personnel vehicles and protestors.

At the time I was in Cairo, the government imposed a curfew from 4pm – 8am, which technically meant no one was allowed outside their home during these hours. Many people in Midan Tahrir, however, disobeyed these orders to continue their protesting, but in other parts of the city it was simply too dangerous to be out since the military had been authorised to ‘shoot to kill’. I stayed out in Midan Tahrir until 6pm on Sunday 31st January, during which time two fighter jets flew low and fast over the square. Every time they flew over, the protestors either erupted in a huge roar (to show that they would not be intimidated) or dropped their jaws in surprise (there seemed to have been little indication they were coming until they were directly overhead!). As a bit of a fluke, I managed to capture the sound of the jets flying over while shooting some of the banter outside the Museum (see below).

The National Democratic Building, of whose charred remains you can see throughout many of my photos, was set alight the day before I arrived in Cairo and understandably sparked a lot of concern for the safety of the Museum. As far as I could tell, the fire didn’t affect the Museum – although there was some evidence of spot fires around the rear of the building and many burnt out vehicles belonging to the tourist police, government organisations and private individuals.

Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

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Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

The city of Cairo has also become a canvas for anti-Mubarak slogans, and I am afraid some of the external walls of the Museum did not escape this. Most of the slogans, translated from the Arabic, read ‘Down with Mubarak!’, ‘He will go!’ and ‘Get out!’ (in addition to many others which weren’t quite as savoury in their expression). A lot of these slogans were also spray painted onto the tanks.

Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

On the day I arrived in Cairo, the media reported that the Egyptian Museum had been broken into. The Minister of Antiquities in Egypt, Dr Zahi Hawass, reported that only 13 out of hundreds of display cases were damaged and 70 objects broken, all of which he claims can be repaired. Among these include a New Kingdom dated coffin, two skulls and a gilded walking stick belonging to Tutankhamun. The new Museum shop was also looted and many replica objects stolen by thieves under the false impression that these were in fact the ‘real deal’. I filmed the coverage of one of these reports on local Egyptian television via my iPhone, which you can see below. This footage shows armed guards patrolling the Museum and some detail shots of a damaged Middle Kingdom dated model boat, a wooden statue and other funerary goods.

While it is not appropriate for me to comment on the country’s political situation here, I should at least point out that the riots of the last week or so are said to have been fuelled by criminals who were released from prison, and more recently, pro-Mubarak supporters. During the time I was in Midan Tahrir, the protests were peaceful and I felt quite safe. There were even many opportunities for me to chat with protestors and share in some spreads of figs, dates, nuts, bananas, wafer biscuits and soft drinks! During these chats, the most common sentiments I heard from the protestors was that they were against violence, they were proud to be Egyptian and they cared for the state of the monuments and museums in their country. Hawass recalls a similar response on his website, “…the people in the streets defend the museums, monuments and sites. When I came into work today, I had to pass through a checkpoint. When the men in the Popular Committees running the checkpoint saw me, they asked ‘Sir, how is the Museum?’. These men may not know how to read or write, but they are worried about their cultural heritage”.

I should also point out that life in many parts of Cairo and the rest of Egypt have been going on as normal despite the uprisings and there continues to be many opportunities for prayer, reflection, downtime and social banter, even in Midan Tahrir itself. This is something the media rarely shows. For example, as you will see in the image below, people have been sleeping the night in the square, cooking food, praying and protesting – after all, no matter what the occasion, people still have basic human needs to fulfil.

Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

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Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

One of President Mubarak’s responses to these uprisings has been the dismissal of his existing cabinet and the installation of a new one. Notably, among these new appointments to his cabinet is the former Director of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, Dr Zahi Hawass. He now holds the post – Minister of Antiquities. Before this, the Supreme Council of Antiquities fell under the Ministry of Culture and earlier, the Ministries of Tourism and Education. Until now, it had never been given a government department in its own right. The decision to make this change during the uprisings demonstrates just how powerful and influential Egypt’s museums and monuments are, in addition to Dr Hawass himself, to the political landscape of the country.

I guess in light of the many requests Egypt has made of overseas museums to repatriate Egyptian antiquities in recent times, it is also imperative that the country be seen to be doing everything in its power to show that they can adequately care for their own cultural heritage. After all, UNESCO and other heritage bodies have been knocking on their door to see if international intervention is necessary to protect their monuments and collections from harms way. Dr Hawass’s new appointment, however, must be doing the trick as the recently released “ICOM Preliminary Report on Museums in Egypt” was, according to Zahi, based “mostly on the statements I made over the past week and those posted here on my website”. In other words, there is no chance of shipping out the Egyptian Museum’s contents to Europe or the USA any time yet!

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Photography by Melanie Pitkin © all rights reserved

I think the Museum as a statement of national pride and identity does in fact have a bigger role to play in the mentality of the people during these uprisings than what many may initially assume. Not only is the physical presence of the Museum always there at the heart of the protests (given its prominent position in Midan Tahrir), but it is a word on the lips of the Egyptian people across all strata of society. I’d be interested to hear what you think.

To read more about the Egyptian Museum during these uprisings, I recommend you visit Dr Hawass’s website here (Dr Hawass has been keeping a daily blog about the situation of Egypt’s cultural heritage and you can also subscribe to his RSS feed) or visit Cambridge University’s Egyptology Resources here.