Category Archives: Ceramics

International Museum Day – where musuem collections make connections

This entry was posted on by .
Sculptural figures (4), 'Tahrir Square souvenirs', porcelain, made by Penny Byrne, Australia, 2011. Repurposed sculptural figures painted in red, black, yellow and green, the colours of the Egyptian flag. The three male and one female figures hold musical instruments featuring the corporate logo of the social networking site, Facebook.  2012/7/1

Sculptural figures (4), 2012/7/1. Collection: Powerhouse Museum

Each year since 1977 International Museums Day (18 May) has celebrated and explored an aspect of Museum work. The multiple connections inherent in these figures make them ideal ambassadors for this year’s theme – ‘Museum collections make connections!

This group of porcelain ‘souvenirs’, re-purposed by Melbourne artist Penny Byrne from kitsch sentimental figurines, generically represent the intangible connectivity of Facebook, and the ability of social media to empower populations sufficiently enough to topple governments. More specifically these figures also connect us across the world to the political turmoil of the ‘Arab Spring’ events of 2011.

Continue reading

Henry Parkes and the ‘crimson thread of kinship’

This entry was posted on by .
Powerhouse Museum Collection object A7335. Gift of Stanley Lipscombe, 1980.

Powerhouse Museum Collection object A7335. Gift of Stanley Lipscombe, 1980.

In a speech to a Federation Conference banquet in 1890, Henry Parkes coined the term crimson thread of kinship to describe the ties that bound the Australian colonies. The reference was to shared Anglo-Celtic bloodlines, to the exclusion of Indigenous, Asian and other contributors to nation-building and the nation’s gene pool. This statuette celebrates his stirring speech, which was to resonate at least until 1914, when the ‘crimson thread’ was used as a call to arms.

Continue reading

Summer cicadas

This entry was posted on by .
A1572 Vase, porcelain blank made by L.Bernardaud & Co., Limoges, France / decorated with cicada design by Delia Cadden, Australia, c. 1913

A1572 Vase, porcelain blank made by L.Bernardaud & Co., Limoges, France / decorated with cicada design by Delia Cadden, Australia, c. 1913

Sydney is currently enjoying a bumper cicada season. To me, these insects are a potent sound of summer and I enjoy their strident chorus building to a crescendo and then tapering off; the volume increasing with the heat. In a year like this everyone talks about them (not all in happy tones) and many children enjoy collecting both the insects and their discarded shells. The cicadas themselves enjoy friendly common names such as Green Grocer, Yellow Mundy and Black Prince. In spite of their fame, cicadas have not been a very common decorative motif in Australia. But there is always something in the Powerhouse Museum Collection!

Continue reading

It’s a small world, art by Kendal Murray, Jeannie Baker and Sandra Taylor

This entry was posted on by .
2012/69/1 Mixed media assemblage 'Deja Vu, Review', mixed material, made by Kendal Murray, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2011. Collection: Powerhouse Museum

2012/69/1 Mixed media assemblage ‘Deja Vu, Review’, mixed material, Kendal Murray, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2011. Collection: Powerhouse Museum

Museums have used toys, models and dioramas to explain and comment on the workings of a larger world. Here, artist Kendal Murray has created a miniature surreal world atop an antique purse though her work Déjà vu, Review’. This sculptural mixed media offers a playful look at the domestic world and holiday culture. The miniature world draws us closer, and invites us to investigate.
Continue reading

Marea Gazzard, AO, CBA (1928- 2013)

This entry was posted on by .
Ceramic form, `Delos: Paros', stoneware, Marea Gazzard, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1972

Ceramic form, `Delos: Paros’, stoneware, Marea Gazzard, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1972.Exhibited in Clay +Fibre exhibition, 1973, Collection: Powerhouse Museum.

The Powerhouse Museum, along with many others in the fields of visual arts and crafts, was sad to hear of the death of Marea Gazzard, on 28th October, 2013. Marea Gazzard was an important figure in the chronology of Australian postwar ceramics, both as a significant and influential innovator in her own work and also in her support of the Australian crafts movement.

Continue reading

Gwyn Hanssen Pigott (1935-2013)

This entry was posted on by .
2002/79/1 Ceramic group, 'Still life with yellow bowls', teapots (2), bottles (4), beakers (3), bowls (2), wheelthrown and slipcast in Limoges porcelain and Southern Ice porcelain, made by Gwyn Hanssen Pigott, Ipswich, Queensland, Australia, 2002

2002/79/1 Ceramic group, ‘Still life with yellow bowls’, teapots (2), bottles (4), beakers (3), bowls (2), wheelthrown and slipcast in Limoges porcelain and Southern Ice porcelain, made by Gwyn Hanssen Pigott, Ipswich, Queensland, Australia, 2002. Collection: Powerhouse Museum

Gwyn Hanssen Pigott was one of Australia’s most illustrious studio ceramicists whose fine skill and cerebral approach to her art will be greatly missed. After a 1960s to 70s repertoire of stone ware, from the 1980s Gwyn became famous for her fine and translucent porcelain forms – bottles, bowls and teapots – deceptively simple but actually requiring great technical skill and firing control. Continue reading

Archaeology Week- ‘Pompeii of the north’ in Powerhouse’s Guildhall Collection

This entry was posted on by .
A3161 Earthenware oil lamp, 1st-2nd century AD

A3161 Earthenware oil lamp, 1st-2nd century AD
Collection: Powerhouse Museum

There is currently great excitement in London as evidence of Roman lives – wonderfully preserved in the London mud – are being extracted by archaeologists. Among the material are hundreds of Roman shoes, jewellery, waxed wooden writing tablets with their writing styli, jewellery, cosmetic tools, part of the Temple of Mithras and of course, pottery galore.
Continue reading

A piece by potter Shigekazu Nagae comes to life

This entry was posted on by .

This beautiful porcelain sculpture, Forms in Succession #5 created by Japanese potter Shigekazu Nagae, dances beautifully in this video. The paper look-alike form somehow evokes the aesthetics of origami, Japanese paper folding. Made by using slip-cast techniques, the porcelain speaks of its origin yet shyly introduces itself to international audiences.
Continue reading

In memory of Janet Mansfield, OAM, (1934 – 2013) Australian potter, author and publisher

This entry was posted on by .
A9113 Pot, salt-glazed [stoneware], Janet Mansfield, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1

A9113 Pot, salt-glazed stoneware, Janet Mansfield, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1982

Janet Mansfield, who passed away on 4th February 2013, had a major impact on Australian and international ceramics. Born in 1934 Janet trained in ceramics at the National Art School, East Sydney, in 1964, ’65, and exhibited widely in Australia and overseas.

Janet Mansfield had over 35 solo exhibitions in Australia, Japan and New Zealand, and was included in group exhibitions in Australia and many other countries. As well as working in her own studio, eventually in Gulgong, she established the Ceramic Art Gallery in Paddington, Sydney, and ran it for many years.

Continue reading

Farewell to curator, Christina Sumner, OAM

This entry was posted on by .
IS-5144-0010-450x266.jpg

Christina Sumner, Principal Curator, Design & Society in the basement with textiles, including 92/775 Suzani (needlework), Collection: Powerhouse Museum

On the eve of of Christina Sumner’s departure we asked her a few questions about her experiences at the Museum over the last 28 years.


What have you enjoyed the most about working in the Museum?

Always always always it’s been the people and the collection. I’ve been lucky enough to spend every working day with curatorial and other colleagues who are bright, interested, articulate and as passionate as I am about the collection – building it, and committing ourselves to interpret, tell stories about and communicate the meaning of our objects to the wider community.

Continue reading