Author Archives: Anni Turnbull

Samurai Fish Brooch by Sheridan Kennedy: A Fine Possession

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2013/80/1 Brooch, 'Samurai Fish', sterling silver / stainless steel, designed and made by Sheridan Kennedy, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2005

2013/80/1 Brooch, ‘Samurai Fish’, sterling silver / stainless steel, designed and made by Sheridan Kennedy, Sydney,  2005. Collection: MAAS. Purchased with funds from the Yasuko Myer Bequest, 2013

One of the most intriguing pieces on display in A Fine Possession: Jewellery and identity  is this   ‘Samurai Fish’ brooch created as part of Sheridan Kennedy’s PhD exhibition The Specious Voyages at the Museum of Brisbane in 2005. The show included a collection of specimens and photographs that resulted from the fantastical, imaginary journey to the ‘New Hybridies’ (sic) undertaken by Kennedy’s alter ego Dr Diane Nhele Keynes. This tongue-in-cheek exhibition explored similarities between the realms of art and science, with Kennedy provocatively stating “It seems that Darwin’s theory of evolution, which is proving so valuable to us in the field of natural sciences, might as readily apply in the cultural sciences… an acquired knowledge adaption, a kind of survival of the fittest ideas… might not Herbert Spencer’s interpretation of Darwin’s theory apply as readily to culture as to nature?” Continue reading

Remembrance Day 2014

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N11162 Badge, Australia:Victoria. Anzac Remembrance Day, 25 April 1915, celluloid on paper. (CI).

N11162 Badge, Australia:Victoria. Anzac Remembrance Day, 25 April 1915, celluloid on paper.Collection: MAAS.

Every year, on 11 November at 11 am – the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month – we pause to remember those men and women who have died or suffered in all wars, conflicts and peace operations. Initially this day marked the end of World War One (WWI).

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Margaret West, jeweller (1936-2014)

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Neckpiece, 'Semi-breve', guitar string / stone / paint, Margaret West, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1996

Neckpiece, ‘Semi-breve’, guitar string / stone / paint, Margaret West, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1996. Collection MAAS

“At present I am concerned with certain metaphysical, psychological and social aspects of jewellery-with its ability to inform and transform’. Margaret West, 1982 *

Margaret West was an influential jeweller, lecturer as well as poet and writer.  The Museum had a long professional association with Margaret West and holds two pieces by her. The one featured above was made in the 1990s and is on display in the Museum’s major exhibition  A Fine Possession :Jewellery and Identity

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Farewell Gough Whitlam (1916- 2014)

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Photograph, 'Gough Whitlam pouring soil into the hands of traditional owner Vincent Lingiari', by Mervyn Bishop, Northern Territory, Australia, 1975

Photograph, ‘Gough Whitlam pouring soil into the hands of traditional owner Vincent Lingiari’, by Mervyn Bishop, Northern Territory, Australia, 1975. Collection: MAAS

Former Prime Minister of Australia, Gough Whitlam led Australia through a period of massive social change from 1972 to 1975 before his ousting by governor-general Sir John Kerr. The photograph above was taken in 1975 at a land hand back ceremony for the Gurindji people in the Northern Territory. The then Prime Minister Gough Whitlam pours soil into the hands of traditional land owner Vincent Lingiari as a symbolic gesture of the return of land. This photograph signifies the Australian Government giving back land to Indigenous people after Vincent Lingiari and four other traditional owners petitioned the Governor-General in 1967 in Australia’s first Aboriginal land rights claim.
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History repeats itself with the new rail link at Castle Hill

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A8461, Candlestick with removable insert, commemorative, ‘Baulkham Hills to Parramatta tramway’,  made by Walker and Hall, Shefield, England, 1890-1900

Candlestick with removable insert, commemorative, ‘Baulkham Hills to Parramatta tramway’, made by Walker and Hall, Shefield, England, 1890-1900

When people from the Hills District catch the new North West Rail Link in 2019 it will not be the first time a railway has come through the area. In 1901 construction began on a tramline that ran between Parramatta and Baulkham Hills with the primary purpose of carrying fruit and goods, as the Hills District was well-known for its plentiful orchards. The purpose of the tramway was to change after an embarrassing mistake that prevented goods being carried through the township of Parramatta, the man who turner the first sod, Minster for Public Works, Mr. E. W. O’Sullivan, tried to rectify the situation to no avail, this resulted in the tramway being used to carry passengers.

In the collection is a commemorative table candlestick that marks the first sod turned at the Baulkham Hills to Parramatta portion of the line gifted to the Minister for Public Works, Mr. E. W. O’ Sullivan, on March 19th, 1901
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A snapshot of installing ‘A fine possession: jewellery and identity’ exhibition

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Conservator Rebecca Ellis working on the Susan Cohen piece for display. Image Marinco Kojdanovski Powerhouse Museum

Conservator Rebecca Ellis working on Safe no. 7 neckpiece, by Susan Cohn,1995. Lent by the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra: Image Marinco Kojdanovski, Powerhouse Museum

Pictured on-site, amidst the installation of A Fine Possession, Rebecca Ellis is seen positioning the mount for the neckpiece by Susan Cohn. Once the mount had been positioned and fixed into place on the fabric covered PET panel, the neckpiece was secured onto the mount. The panel was then attached vertically to the back of the showcase using split battens to complete the display.

It’s good to give conservators a challenge and there were a few in the jewellery exhibition  A fine Possession. With over 700 beautiful pieces of jewellery on display there is a diversity of materials to be managed. The jewellers used paper to plastic (recycled and 3D printed), metals including gold, ceramics, gems, glass, bone, feathers, cotton, insects, hair and nylon. Much thought and planning has gone into the management, care and display of these objects, drawn both from the Museum’s own collection and institutional and individual lenders.
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A Fine Possession and solving the mystery of a French pendant

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H5025 Pendant, set with gouache miniature on cardboard depicting a hot-air balloon flight of the Montgolfier Brothers, gilt metal cannetille, paste (glass), maker unknown, France, about 1783-1815

H5025 Pendant, set with gouache miniature on cardboard depicting a hot-air balloon flight of the Montgolfier Brothers, gilt metal cannetille, paste (glass), maker unknown, France, about 1783-1815. Collection Powerhouse Museum.

Every now and again when working with a Museum’s collection, you will come across an object that was acquired so long ago that little is known about its provenance. There are a few meagre clues to help uncover what you hope will turn out to be an enriching and surprising story, something that shows that this piece is special. And once and a while, the story exceeds your expectations.
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Jewellery at the Powerhouse: an interns perspective

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Interchangeable Pendant System series 3, prototype 2 (2013):

Interchangeable Pendant System series 3, prototype 2 (2013):

One of the striking things I have discovered while researching Australian and international jewellery in preparation for the exhibition A fine possession: jewellery and identity, is the way in which the contemporary Australian jewellery scene has been shaped by European tradition. Beginning my research as a complete novice on the subject of jewellery, I came in with the big (and unconscious) assumption that contemporary jewellery generally, and contemporary Australian jewellery in particular, is a craft far removed from traditional concepts and practices of jewellery making. To my surprise and fascination I found that contemporary Australian jewellery has been influenced by a number of innovative Europeans who visited and lectured in Australia and who immigrated to here in late 20th century, bringing with them ideas and skills. My assumptions were completely blown out of the water when I discovered more about jeweller Johannes Kuhnen’s and his piece, the Interchangeable Pendant System 3.2.

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Convict jacket

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A9762, jacket, mens, convict period, felted wool, maker unknown (war department, made in Great Britain, worn in Australia, 1855-1880

A9762, jacket, mens, convict period, felted wool, maker unknown (war department, made in Great Britain, worn in Australia, 1855-1880

This coarse wool jacket is a reminder of the harsh life experienced by convicts in colonial times. Conspicuous, two- coloured uniforms were made to differentiate troublesome convicts and humiliate them, and ensured it was difficult to escape undetected.

For convicts transported to the colonies of Australia, inadequate clothing was one of the many hardships to be endured. Although many thousands of convicts were transported to New South Wales between 1788 and 1840, few articles of convict clothing have survived. They were not considered prized items to be preserved. The Australian Dress Register documents a few convict items.

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Sir Henry Parkes: Not just the father of federation

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85/1286-509 Glass negative, full plate, 'Sir Henry Parkes', unattributed studio, Sydney, Australia, c. 1880-1923

85/1286-509 Glass negative, full plate, ‘Sir Henry Parkes’, unattributed studio, Sydney, Australia, c. 1880-1923. Coolection: Powerhouse Museum

Many Australians associate Federation with Sir Henry Parkes and his significant contribution in bringing Australia together in 1901, but he was much more than that. Parkes arrived in Sydney in 1839 with his wife and young child (Sir Henry would eventually father 17 children), finding work as a laborer and later in a foundry. He was also a bone and ivory turner and manufacturer, journalist, publisher, writer and politician.
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