David Mist collection digitization project

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Portrait of children published in ‘Sydney: a book of photographs’, 1969

Portrait of children published in ‘Sydney: a book of photographs’, 1969

The Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences holds two important photography archives related to Sydney photographer David Mist – the Studio Ten archive (92/401) acquired as a gift of the photographer in 1992, and the David Mist archive (96/44/1) acquired as a gift of the photographer under the Australian Government Taxation Incentives for the Arts program in 1996. In recent years David Mist has been helping digitize these irreplaceable analogue collections with the Museum regularly lending David batches of negatives and transparencies to scan. These digital records then get added to the Collection Database. Thank you David!
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Sir Henry Parkes: Not just the father of federation

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85/1286-509 Glass negative, full plate, 'Sir Henry Parkes', unattributed studio, Sydney, Australia, c. 1880-1923

85/1286-509 Glass negative, full plate, ‘Sir Henry Parkes’, unattributed studio, Sydney, Australia, c. 1880-1923. Coolection: Powerhouse Museum

Many Australians associate Federation with Sir Henry Parkes and his significant contribution in bringing Australia together in 1901, but he was much more than that. Parkes arrived in Sydney in 1839 with his wife and young child (Sir Henry would eventually father 17 children), finding work as a laborer and later in a foundry. He was also a bone and ivory turner and manufacturer, journalist, publisher, writer and politician.

Beakers (2) and lidded jug, electroplated silver / oak, maker unknown, England, [1850s], owned by Sir Henry Parkes, collected by Thomas Handcock Lennard. Collexction Powerhouse Museum

A2349 Beakers (2) and lidded jug, electroplated silver / oak, maker unknown, England, [1850s], owned by Sir Henry Parkes, collected by Thomas Handcock Lennard. Collection: Powerhouse Museum

In 1845 he set up business in Kent Street, purchased a lathe and set to work on creating beautiful handcrafted objects, the Powerhouse Museum has a collection of objects relating to Sir Henry Parkes.

Spinning top, child’s toy, made by Sir Henry Parkes company, wood, Sydney, Australia, 1850-1890

A7806 Spinning top, child’s toy, made by Sir Henry Parkes company, wood, Sydney, Australia, 1850-1890

Personally Sir Henry and his wife Clarinda were going through a difficult time, with the loss of a child, professionally his business was prospering resulting in new premises at 25 Hunter Street and other branches opening in regional NSW and Victoria. By the end of the 1840’s Parkes was one of 14 other bone and ivory turner in Sydney, prompting him to broadened his business, he did this by expanding his store to included imported fancy wares 1.

A7800 Domestic ware, umbrella handle, supplied by Henry Parkes and Co., Sydney, 1850-1900

A7800 Domestic ware, umbrella handle, supplied by Henry Parkes and Co., Sydney, 1850-1900. Cololection Powerhouse Museum

Sir Henry went on to have a career in journalism and as a publisher. Below is the Albion press (displayed in Technologies that changed our mind 2013-14) imported from England and used by Henry Parkes to produce the newspaper the ‘Empire’, of which he was proprietor and editor, from 1850-1856. This newspaper was the chief proponent of mid 19th century liberalism and its pages were a forum for the sharpest radical and liberal viewpoints of the day. The press was then purchased by Messrs. Craigie and Hipgrave of Armidale, when this firm issued the Armidale ‘Express’.

H3408 Albion hand printing press, iron, manufactured by A Wilson & Sons, London, England

H3408 Albion hand printing press, iron, manufactured by A Wilson & Sons, London, England. Gift of Armidale Newspapers Ltd, 1929 

 

He was elected to the legislative council in 1856 and Premier of New South Wales in 1872, he was 57 and robust with a shaggy beard- the iconic image of Sir Henry Parkes. His tenure lasted until 1875.

On 2 March, 1891 Sir Henry was elected president of the National Australasian Convention, in attendance were delegates from the colonies and New Zealand. At the opening dinner for the convention Parkes made a toast ‘One people, one destiny’ 2. It appeared that he was ready for the colonies to join and make his mark in Australian history.

References:
1 Sir Henry Parkes, The Australian Colossus, S Dando-Collins, Random House Australia, 2013

2.  Sir Henry Parkes, A.W Martin

Henry Parkes and the ‘crimson thread of kinship’

Henry Parkes, Father of Australian Federation

Written by Kate Clancy, Curatorial Volunteer

Wire has many uses from bee houses to candle snuffers

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90/58-111 Sculptural form, face, glass/metal/insulating wire, Douglas Annand, Sydney, 1950

90/58-111 Sculptural form, face, glass/metal/insulating wire, Douglas Annand, Sydney, 1950

Wire has been a material used in a variety of areas from the domestic sphere to agricultural, medical and applied arts areas. The Museum’s collection has wire products from cake cooling racks to electrical components and to sculptures like the one above made by designer Douglas Annand. The sculpture is a collage of various materials to create an outline of a human face. The central feature is a cylindrical clear glass form containing a blue liquid, with a number of circular indents, creating glass feet, and a nose. Green insulating wire is wound around glass and extends out either side with a green button for each eye.
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Science Week 2014: Super Sopper and super fun at Castle Hill

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Powerhouse Museum collection object 2001/76/1. Gift of Kuranda Manufacturing, 2001.

Powerhouse Museum collection object 2001/76/1. Gift of Kuranda Manufacturing, 2001.

The Powerhouse Discovery Centre will celebrate Science Week with lots of activities on the weekend of 16-17 August. Our example of the Super Sopper, an Australian innovation that has been removing excess water from sports fields for forty years, is one of many objects that will star in behind-the-scenes tours. Liquid nitrogen, fire and chocolate are a few themes explored in a bagful of spectacular science shows that all visitors can watch. There are plenty of hands-on science experiences and object talks that are open to all. But numbers are limited for behind-the-scenes tours and some workshops, so early booking is recommended. And don’t miss the bees, python, lizard and frogs and the chance to talk to their expert handlers.

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The Story of Australia’s First Airmail-Part 9

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Guillaux preparing to take off from Ascot racecourse in August 1914. These film frames come from a segment of newsreel in the Museum’s collection. Presented by Mr F Kilian, Editor, Movie Tone News, 1961. P2670-10/2

Guillaux preparing to take off from Ascot racecourse in August 1914. These film frames come from a segment of newsreel in the Museum’s collection. Presented by Mr F Kilian, Editor, Movie Tone News, 1961. P2670-10/2

Despite the rigours of the first airmail flight from Melbourne to Sydney over July 16-18 (as recounted in parts 6-8 of this story), Maurice Guillaux was not one to rest on his laurels. Within days he was in the air again, making several flights with Lebbeus Hordern’s Farman Hydro-aeroplane (see part 3 of this story), including one on July 22 when he carried two passengers, Hordern and Lt. Colonel WWR Watson, on the first three-person flight in Australia. With Hordern perched precariously on the aircraft’s fuel tank, Guillaux took the Hydro-aeroplane up to 1500ft (almost 500m) and put it through a series of manoeuvres, including a thrilling dive towards the water.

In carrying without difficulty a slightly higher total payload (209kg) than the aircraft was supposed to carry (203kg), this flight demonstrated the potential of the aeroplane as a weapon capable of carrying a militarily useful bomb load, in addition to a pilot and bombardier. With the clouds of war gathering in Europe at the outbreak of World War I, Guillaux made frequent comments about the utility of planes in warfare and their probable use in the conflict: “aerial machines would prove perhaps the greatest factor in the present struggle.”

: Lebbeus Hordern’s Farman “hydro-aeroplane”, in which Guillaux would carry two passengers, an Australian first, in July 1914 Gift of S. Dyson, 1982. P3283-1

Lebbeus Hordern’s Farman “hydro-aeroplane”, in which Guillaux would carry two passengers, an Australian first, in July 1914, Gift of S. Dyson, 1982. P3283-1

On July 25, Guillaux gave another aerial performance with the Bleriot at Newcastle, drawing a crowd of about 10,000 exactly three months after his first performance in that city. He discussed plans for a tour of the northern regions of NSW, but these would never eventuate due to the war. Guillaux agreed to undertake an advertising stunt for Black and White Whiskey, dropping envelopes containing money over Circular Quay on July 31, but the police cancelled this event over fears of possible injuries in the waiting crowd of 5,000, as people jostled to catch the falling prizes.

Guillaux’ last major aviation display for Sydney was scheduled for Saturday, August 1. Unfortunately for the French pilot, his only serious accident in Australia occurred during this performance. Shortly after his takeoff from Ascot racecourse (on the site of what was later to become Kingsford-Smith Aerodrome), while he was flying at a height of 100-200 ft (30-60m; accounts vary as to the altitude), Guillaux seemed to lose control of the Bleriot, which dipped as if commencing a dive, but then plummeted to the ground, with Guillaux apparently wrestling with the controls. The stunned crowd stood transfixed as the Bleriot smashed into the ground alongside one of the track railings, the body of the aircraft breaking into two pieces.

Frames from a film clip of the Bleriot’s crash at Ascot racecourse, showing Guillaux being rescued from the wreckage and led away, bandaged, for hospital treatment. Presented by Mr F Kilian, Editor, Movie Tone News, 1961. P2670-10/2

Frames from a film clip of the Bleriot’s crash at Ascot racecourse, showing Guillaux being led away, bandaged, for hospital treatment. Presented by Mr F Kilian, Editor, Movie Tone News, 1961. P2670-10/2

Trapped in a tangle of broken fuselage and wires, the half-conscious Guillaux was rescued from the wreckage by members of the crowd, who cut away the debris and carefully lifted him free. Although he suffered cuts to his face, arms and legs, his clothes were badly torn and the ligaments of his right ankle ruptured, Guillaux luckily did not sustain any more serious injuries. Treated at the crash site, with his head swathed in bandages, he nevertheless waved as he was helped away, at which the crowd cheered wildly and the band played the Marseillaise.

Guillaux was taken in a car to St Vincent’s Hospital, in Darlinghurst, where he was treated by Sir Alexander McCormick. He spent a few days in hospital recovering, receiving many messages of sympathy and support. The Bleriot, however, was quite severely damaged “the framework was broken in two pieces, the tail planes badly damaged….the propeller was smashed to matchwood, the oil tanks were bent into one another and the engine was buried in the ground”.

The cause of the accident seems to have been the steering gear controlling the warping of the wings to provide lateral control (the Bleriot did not use ailerons) jamming in some way. Guillaux reported that he was unable to steer the plane left or right, but he did still have control of the elevator planes and could have landed safely in the crowd; but as this would have meant danger to the spectators he chose, instead, to make the plane dive into the ground away from them.

Newsreel film frames showing he wreckage of the Bleriot after the crash, nose first into the ground. Guillaux clearly had a lucky escape from serious injury. Presented by Mr F Kilian, Editor, Movie Tone News, 1961. P2670-10/2

Newsreel film frames showing he wreckage of the Bleriot after the crash, nose first into the ground. Guillaux clearly had a lucky escape from serious injury. Presented by Mr F Kilian, Editor, Movie Tone News, 1961. P2670-10/2 

 

Look out for the next instalment of Guillaux’ story in September. If you’d like to explore the newspaper reports of Guillaux’ flights, which were drawn upon for this blogpost, you can find them by searching on the National Library of Australia’s Trove Newspapers site. The Aviation Historical Society of Australia conducted a re-enactment of the first airmail flight between July 12-14. The Powerhouse Museum is also celebrating the centenary of the first Australian airmail with various events this year. Check our website and that of the Powerhouse Discovery Centre for further details.

Written by Kerrie Dougherty Space Technology and Aviation Curator

Celebrating Engineering Week 2014: A Model steam tram with double-decker trailing car

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Powerhouse Museum Collection, object B2566. Gift of A Cutcher, 1984.

Powerhouse Museum Collection, object B2566. Gift of A Cutcher, 1984.

I chose this object to celebrate Engineering Week (4-10 August 2014). It’s an excellent working model of a steam tram, the first type of tram that served Sydney. Now the city’s light rail system, which is tiny compared to the extensive electric system that followed the steam tram era, is set to grow. If you’d like to hear top-level presenters speak about this extension, you can register to attend a free Engineering Week forum on Sydney’s Light Rail on 6 August, 6 to 8 pm, at the Powerhouse Museum.  Several other events are also planned for the week.

Should transport engineers be inspired by the model, with its double-decker trailing car? People are already questioning whether the new trams will have enough capacity to meet demand in the busy south east of the city, which has no heavy rail service. Sydney led the world with its extensive use of double-decker trains, and double-decker buses recently returned to the city’s streets; perhaps double-decker trams should be considered as well.

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Prize pool

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Detail model, entry structure 2008. Powerhouse Museum collection, gift of Rachel Neeson in memory of Nicholas Murcutt.

Detail model, entry structure 2008. Powerhouse Museum collection, donated through the Cultural Gifts Program by Rachel Neeson in memory of Nicholas Murcutt.

A lot of people were pleased when Prince Alfred Park swimming pool starred at the recent 2014 NSW architecture awards. As well as the prize gong, the Sulman Medal for public architecture, the new pool received the Lloyd Rees Award for urban design.

I was among the pleased people as during 2013 I acquired a collection of 18 models made during the pool’s design and approval process. Rachel Neeson who designed the pool with her late partner Nicholas Murcutt suggested that I must have ‘sniffed’ an award win 12 months ago. I certainly loved the pool but also like anyone who visits architect studios I was often struck by the number of design models lying around apparently discarded.  Despite the advent of 3D imaging and design software models are still a crucial part of the design process for most architects, hence my request to Rachel for the pool models.
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An introduction to Eloise Crossman’s 2014 Powerhouse Museum Movable Heritage Project: Addressing Maitland’s Closet Past

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Grossman House (pictured right) and it's neighbor Brough House

Grossmann House (on the right) and its neighbour Brough House. Image Alan Todd, Grossmann House.

Whether frock, gown, robe or shift, regalia or rags, our clothes are and have always been culturally significant. We dress ourselves because it is custom, but also for acceptance, for status and out of caprice.

Humans have invented distinctive costume for every condition and occasion, and a well-provenanced garment can reveal a great deal about a person and or place; a narrative, as it were.

The same can be said of Australian clothing, and that within the collections of the Australian Museum of Clothing and Textiles and Grossmann House.

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Fight the Fly: the only good fly is a dead fly

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Tin, fly killer, rectangular tin with sloping edges, transfer print on upper side of white daisies with cork centres, marked "Daisy Fly Killer contents posionous", with instructions for use, Harold Somers, New York, USA, c. 1888-1929

Tin, fly killer, rectangular tin with sloping edges, transfer print on upper side of white daisies with cork centres, marked “Daisy Fly Killer contents posionous”, with instructions for use, Harold Somers, New York, USA, c. 1888-1929. Collection: Powerhouse Museum

There are 30,00 types of flies, one of the most familiar and widely distributed is the house fly. Besides being annoying it can also carry diseases.like typhus, dysentery, and tuberculosis,

The introduction of cattle to  Australia in 1788 gave the fly increased access to one of it’s food sources, animal dung.

Australian have battled flies n the home and in the paddocks.and the Museum holds a wide variety of approaches to combat flies from poisons like the oddly named and decorated Daisy killer pictured above to fly swats, fly paper and glass flay traps.  

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Ultimo on the edge

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Lend lease

Model, Jacksons Landing, Pyrmont, made for Lend Lease by Porter Models, 2001-2010. Powerhouse Museum collection, gift of Jacksons Landing Community Association.,

The Powerhouse is located in what is now the densest suburb in Australia. With 14,300 people per square kilometre Pyrmont/Ultimo packs more residents into less space than any suburb or town in the nation.  I suppose this should be no surprise given the numerous apartment developments completed here in the last decade, notably the repurposing of the wool stores and CSR’s former factories at Pyrmont Point. We recently acquired this large model of the Jacksons Landing development at the Point.

Pyrmont/Ultimo is on the leading edge of a much-debated urban trend towards apartment living rather than the ‘Australian dream’ of single-family cottages in sprawling suburbs. Sydney has historically been Australia’s leading apartment city. Way back in 1934 Melbourne’s Australian Home Beautiful observed ‘Sydney has always, to some extent, been the home of the flat-dweller. For this a variety of reasons may be suggested, the most popular one being that the Sydneysider is more easy-going and less home-loving than his Melbourne brother…’
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