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API, DATA ACCESS and 3D SCANS


The Powerhouse Museum is committed to making its collection dataset available to the community in many forms. Traditionally we've done this by publishing collection records to our website, but now we also offer direct data access. This allows you to make your own interfaces to the collection and incorporate it into other services.

If you want full access including thumbnails then we recommend you use the API (application programming interface). The API uses a RESTful model and currently returns data as JSON, JSONP, YAML and XML. You can also query it using YQL.

API content is released under a CC BY-NC Creative Commons Non-Commercial Attribution license.

--> APPLY FOR A FREE API KEY

  • Contains over 96,000 items, and
  • over 98,000 thumbnails
  • as well as structure, tags, and full object details

If you do use our API for a project then we'd love to know what you've done with it. Not only are we very interested in what you can do with our data, it also helps us justify the continued improvement of the API in the future.

Tell us via api [at] phm.gov.au


--> 3D SCANS

Available for download here are the first of our 3D scans of selected objects from our collection. The ZIP files provided contain several STL files of varying size and complexity for you to use on the augmented web for 3D printing or other exciting things you can think of. We invite you to remix and reinterpret our objects and we'd love to hear about the interesting ways you're using them.

We set about digitising these 10 collection objects in 3D for Hack the Collection, a program for Sydney Design 2014. The event brings together 10 Sydney designers, who over two days will hack these objects, giving new life and meaning to them. They will then be 3D printed in the festival FabLab and displayed alongside the original.
This content is released under a CC BY-NC Creative Commons Non-Commercial Attribution license.

Campanian askos


Download STL file [34MB]

Object info not online.

Toy racing car, c.1930

Download STL file [100MB]

Read object info.

Bust of Charles Darwin, c.1899

Download STL file [89MB]

Read object info.

Model of a heart


Download STL file [94MB]

Read object info.

Armour helmet, 16th Century

Download STL file [94MB]

Read object info.

Olivetti Calculator, 1964

Download STL file [102MB]

Read object info.

Ericofon Telephone, c.1961

Download STL file [76MB]

Read object info.

Womens leather boot, c.1873

Download STL file [92MB]

Read object info.

Wedgwood sugar bowl

Download STL file [64MB]

Read object info.

Enamel bed pan, 1910-1940

Download STL file [57MB]

Read object info.


--> WORDPRESS PLUGIN

With our WordPress collection plugin and a free API key anyone can now embed a grid of collection objects in their WordPress blog. Object grids can be placed in posts and pages, or even as a sidebar widget.

Each grid can have different display parameters and contents. It even has a nice friendly backend for customising, and because we're hosting it through WordPress, when new features are added it will be able to be auto-upgraded through your blog's control panel.

So, if you have a WordPress blog and feel like embedding some objects, download it, read the online documentation, and go for it.


If you just need to ingest a dataset or simply view a subset, then we also offer a downloadable tab-seperated values spreadsheet. This single file download contains basic metadata for objects, no images, and without the structure and depth of the data accessible through the API. This basic metadata is released under a CC-BY-SA Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike license.

--> DOWNLOAD SIMPLIFIED DATASET

  • Contains 109,756 rows
  • Generated on 4 March 2012
  • 11.9MB zipped, 79.7MB unzipped

Please also understand that the data contained within is covered by the same caveat that the our site operates under - "Research and documentation, both textual and photographic, of the Museum's collection is a continuous process and so from time to time the information for an object may be out of date or simply reflect the knowledge available at the time of writing."