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Clothing and Dress > Hats

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Hats made in the Philippines, 1980 - 1988
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Object statement
Hats (4), plant fibre, various makers, Philippines, used by the AusAID Centre for Pacific Development and Training, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1980-1988
These four hats are representative examples of utilitarian headwear from the Philippines. They form part of a collection of headwear whose significance reflects both the diversity of their countries of origin and their gift to the AusAID Centre for Pacific Development and Training (AIDAB) as a token of appreciation. The hats were gifted to AIDAB by students who attended courses there between 1980 and 1988. The concept for the collection was initiated by Leon Robert (Bob) Heron, Principal of the Centre, after seeing a similar collection at a training unit in Geneva, Switzerland. The hat collection, which reflects Australia's long engagement with the Asia Pacific region as a training provider, was displayed at the Centre in Sydney, acting as a visual manifestation of the countries that benefited from training courses there.

The AusAID Centre for Pacific Development and Training (AIDAB) was founded in 1947 and until 1971 was known as the Australian School of Pacific Administration (ASOPA). Between 1971 and 1987 it became the International Training Institute (ITI) and finally AIDAB from 1997 to 1998. The Centre was known as ITI when the hats were originally donated by the students.

AIDAB grew out of an army civil affairs unit created during World War II and was based in the military precinct at Georges Heights, Middle Head, Sydney from 1948. From its early years AIDAB played an important role in the development of Papua New Guinea. By 1970 the Commonwealth Government had realised that despite its goal of independence for Papua New Guinea, the indigenous public service were not adequately trained. Thus the role of AIDAB changed to become a training centre to prepare Papuans and New Guineans for impending self government. Training was also made available to other nations in the Asia Pacific region. Until its closure in January 1998 the Centre still received strong demand for its education and teaching.

For 51 years AIDAB was a highly successful institution which provided continuing academic excellence and quality teaching and research. The organisation was Australia's only training institution established to train administrators and officers for Australia's overseas territories. Structural and name changes to the organisation reflect Federal Government foreign policy shifts in the Asia Pacific region over half a century.

During its history AIDAB was known for its association with a number of notable academics and administrators. John Kerr (later Sir John Kerr QC, Governor General of Australia) served as Principal in 1947. Others include the poet James MacAuley, Lieutenant Colonel Alf Conlon, Charles Rowley, Peter Lawrence, Camilla Wedgwood and Bob Carr (later Premier of New South Wales). Jack Mattes, a former principal of the Centre, remained at the centre to compile the laws of Papua New Guinea.

AIDAB is also an important element in the entire former military reserve and defence lands at Middle Head, George's Heights and Chowder Bay, which are historically significant as the location of continuous major defence works for Sydney Harbour and Port Jackson during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Rebecca Bower, June 2008

References:
Sydney Harbour Federation Trust, Management Plan - Mosman No. 7, Middle Head, 7 June 2007
Goff, Bill., 'The end of a unique institution', Focus, AusAID, March 1998, p20-22
Maxwell, Robyn., Textiles of Southeast Asia tradition, trade and transformation, Australian National Gallery Oxford University Press, 1990
Hats made in the Philippines between 1980 and 1988.

A photograph Belinda Capul, who donated the sun hat (solar topi), appears in one of the photograph albums, see 2008/198/12-1.
These hats are from a group of hats donated by students attending courses at the AusAID Centre for Pacific Development and Training, from 1980-1988 when it was known as the International Training Institute (ITI). The collection was initiated by Leon Robert (Bob) Heron, Principal of ITI, after seeing a similar collection at a training unit in Geneva, Switzerland.

Students donated hats from their countries of origin as a gesture of thanks to ITI for their training and experience. Contemporary photographs of interiors of the Centre indicate the hats were pinned on boards and displayed on the walls. The collection features a large group of hats from the Philippines because of the large number of Philippino students undertaking courses at the Centre.

The organisation known as The AusAID Centre for Pacific Development and Training (AIDAB) was originally known as the The Australian School of Pacific Administration (ASOPA) from 1947-1971. It became the International Training Institute (ITI) from 1971-1987 and finally AIDAB from 1987-1998. It is most commonly known as ASOPA.

AIDAB grew out of an army civil affairs unit created during World War II. The unit was known originally as the Land Headquarters School of Civil Affairs, based at the Royal Military College, Duntroon, Canberra. In 1947 the Commonwealth Government approved the establishment of a Civil School as a permanent body with teaching and research duties. It was based in the military precinct at Georges Heights, Middle Head, Sydney.

From its early years AIDAB played an important role in the development of Papua New Guinea. From 1948 AIDAB offered courses to train Australians as administrators for Papua New Guinea, many of whom made a significant contribution to the country's development.

Throughout the 1950s and 1960s AIDAB grew in stature, size and significance as its training courses developed. During this period courses diversified into primary and secondary teacher training for both Papua New Guinea and Northern Territory indigenous schools, as well as for senior local government officials.

By 1970 the Commonwealth Government had realised that despite its goal of making Papua New Guinea independent, there was no adequately trained public service of indigenous people in the country. In 1971, the role of AIDAB changed to become a training centre for Papuans and New Guineans, preparing them for impending self government. Participants from other developing countries in the Asia Pacific region could also now attend.

In 1973 the School was integrated into the structure of the office of the Australian Development Assistance Agency and became known as the International Training institute (ITI). The Institute ran short and refresher courses in education and middle management. At its height in the 1980s the Institute was conducting 23 short courses per year.

In 1987 the Institute became the AusAID Centre for Pacific Development and Training (AIDAB). Until its closure in January 1998 the Centre still received strong demand for its education and teaching.

 This text content licensed under CC BY-NC.

Description
Hats (4), plant fibre, various makers, Philippines, used by the AusAID Centre for Pacific Development and Training, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1980-1998

Four wide brimmed hats made in the Philippines.

A sun hat (solar topi). A wide brimmed conical hat with rounded crown, featuring a rigid underlying leaf base, overlaid in open work plaiting in polished bamboo, the edges bound in either bamboo or pandanas leaf. Additional decoration on the crown in the form of a six pointed star. The hat features a chin strap in plaited reed or bamboo chain link. Label attached.

A sun hat (solar topi). A wide brimmed conical hat, featuring underlying herringbone pattern woven [pandanas] leaf structure, overlaid in two colour geometric pattern derived from contrasting plait weave. The underside of the brim features plaited pandanas leaf elements. Label attached.

A wide brimmed hat, made in very finely woven reed, featuring a twill weave crown and basketweave brim. A decorative hat band and diamond shaped decorative elements on the crown of the hat feature in a contrasting darker colour. Label attached.

A pander hat featuring a wide brim and deep crown. The hat is woven in plain weave using multiple elements, edges are turned over and tucked in. Label attached.

Made: Philippines; 1980 - 1988
Marks
-1 Paper label stuck to inside rim. Printed in ink 'Philippines'.
-2 Donor's details handwritten on paper label adhered to underside of brim, 'BELINA [sic] S B CAPUL / PHILIPPINES / MEDIA MANAGEMENT / TERM 1, 1985'.
-3 Origin of hat, handwritten text on paper label adhered to underside of brim, 'PHILIPPINES'.
-4 Hat label, on paper tag adhered to crown of hat with adhesive, typed text; 'Pandan Hat / Made in the / Province of Palawan, Philippines / Courtesy of Forester / Virginia B. Lobaton'.
2008/198/9
Production date
1980 - 1988

 This text content licensed under CC BY-SA.
Acquisition credit line
Gift of AusAID, 2008
Subjects
+ National dress
+ International aid
+ Multiculturalism
+ Southeast Asian cultures
Short persistent URL
Concise link back to this object: http://from.ph/381300
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{{cite web |url=http://from.ph/381300 |title=Hats made in the Philippines |author=Powerhouse Museum |accessdate=21 December 2014 |publisher=Powerhouse Museum, Australia}}


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