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2005/185/1-2 Prototype, high chair, 'Nest', polyethylene / metal, designed by Sally Dominguez, Bug Design, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2002, made by Mozzee Design, United Kingdom, 2004
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Object statement
Prototype, high chair, 'Nest', polyethylene / metal, designed by Sally Dominguez, Bug Design, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2002, made by Mozzee Design, United Kingdom, 2004
The 'Nest' high chair was originally designed in 2002 and shown at DesignEX in Melbourne and 100% Design in London the same year. With its scooped-out plastic seat and detachable tray for babies and toddlers, the chair is also convertible to an all-purpose low chair for older children by removing the tray and the metal column supporting the seat. 'Nest's' stylish 'sixties' look, practicality and stringent safety features, made it an immediate success and it subsequently won an Australian Design Awards 'DesignMark' as well as the Design Institute of Australia's Furniture Design Award in 2003.

Since 2002 the design of chair has been through a number of modifications to improve it functionally and aesthetically and is now manufactured in the United Kingdom with a worldwide distribution. The components of this acquisition include the original 'Nest' and a prototype of the final version of the chair, a prototype seat shell and prototypes trays. A final production version of the chair is being separately acquired thus demonstrating the design progression of the chair over three years.

Sally Dominguez is a Sydney architect. After the birth of her first child she established Bug Design with friend Susan Burns in 2001 to design products for babies and young children. Acquisition of the 'Nest' high chair and its later versions and component prototypes will enable representation of this important example of contemporary local design in the collection as well as provide an opportunity in future exhibitions to demonstrate the lengthy process of experimentation and modification often necessary to arrive at a final, successful design.
The original 'Nest' and prototype shell (orange) made by Bug Design, Sydney; the final prototype version made by Mozzee Design, United Kingdom. The seat shell and tray made using rotation moulding technology. The column and tray of each chair is removable allowing the chair to be lowered for use by an older child.
After production of the first 'Nest' in 2002 the design of the chair went through a modification process to improve its look and function. Modifications included a change to the shape of the seat shell and rounding of its edges and changes to the attachment mechanism and location points of the detachable tray.

 This text content licensed under CC BY-NC.

Description
Prototype, high chair, 'Nest', polyethylene / metal, designed by Sally Dominguez, Bug Design, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2002, made by Mozzee Design, United Kingdom, 2004

Protoype of later modified version of child's high chair in white polyethylene with a scooped out half shell seat with detachable tray with attachment points on top of the shell edges.
Made: 2004
2005/185/1-2
Production date
2004
Height
810 mm
Diameter
480 mm

 This text content licensed under CC BY-SA.
Acquisition credit line
Gift of Sally Dominguez and Susan Burns, Bug Design Pty Ltd, 2005
Short persistent URL
Concise link back to this object: http://from.ph/371702
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{{cite web |url=http://from.ph/371702 |title=2005/185/1-2 Prototype, high chair, 'Nest', polyethylene / metal, designed by Sally Dominguez, Bug Design, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2002, made by Mozzee Design, United Kingdom, 2004 |author=Powerhouse Museum |accessdate=22 September 2014 |publisher=Powerhouse Museum, Australia}}


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