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Sanitary pads in packaging, 1960 - 1970
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Object statement
Sanitary pads in packaging (7), opened bag originally holding 12 pads, 'Modess', paper / cloth, made by Johnson & Johnson Pty Ltd, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, probably 1960-1970
The American company Johnson & Johnson commenced manufacturing sanitary napkins in the 1920s. Modess were introduced to the Australian market by Johnson & Johnson in 1932. A huge marketing campaign saw advertisements in newspapers and women's magazines emphasizing 'style and quality', expressed through illustrations of women in elegant evening gowns. Since then, developments in such technologies as nonwovens and plastics have seen many changes in the design of menstrual products. Absorbency and softness have improved, for example.

Menstruation has been a private and, until the recent advent of explicit television commercials, almost unmentionable subject. It is therefore not surprising that the artefacts of menstruation are not well represented in Australian museum collections, even though they are an intrinsic part of women's lives. When cupboards are cleared out or when the effects of elderly relatives are being sorted through, personal items like these are usually amongst the first things to be thrown away.

The Powerhouse Museum has a small but growing collection of items relating to menstruation. It includes manufactured products like this bag of Modess, home-made washable sanitary towels, advertising material, and advice booklets for girls.

Written by Erika Dicker
Assistant Curator, 2007.
Made by Johnson & Johnson Pty Ltd, Sydney, Australia, probably between 1960-1970.

 This text content licensed under CC BY-NC.

Description
A paper bag containing 7 menstrual pads (also known as sanitary napkins or sanitary towels). The bag originally held 12. The bag is printed with two pink panels down either side. The front and back of the paper bag are printed with pink and orange flowers on a white background. The pads are made of white absorbent material covered with white gauze. One pad has been removed from the pack and is separate.

Made: Johnson & Johnson Pty Ltd; Australia; 1960 - 1970
Marks
Printed on back of bag, pink ink 'IMPORTANT / Wear Coloured Line away from / body because this marks the / side of MODESS containing / the full-length safety shields, / MODESS NAPKINS WITH / MASSLINN NON-WOVEN / FABRIC COVER / Johnson and Johnson / PTY LTD SYDNEY / For maximum protection and / comfort, wear your napkin with / a MODESS Belt or MODESS / panty.

Printed on side end of bag, pink ink '12 SUPER / MODESS LARGER FOR EXTRA PROTECTION / feminine napkins.

Printed on front of bag, white ink 'with special deodorant'.
2007/141/1
Production date
1960 - 1970
Height
260 mm
Width
150 mm
Depth
80 mm

 This text content licensed under CC BY-SA.
Acquisition credit line
Gift of Mrs Judy Keena, 2007
Subjects
+ Menstruation
Short persistent URL
Concise link back to this object: http://from.ph/366670
Cite this object in Wikipedia
Copy and paste this wiki-markup:

{{cite web |url=http://from.ph/366670 |title=Sanitary pads in packaging |author=Powerhouse Museum |accessdate=17 September 2014 |publisher=Powerhouse Museum, Australia}}


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