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Electronics > Prototypes

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Prototype for electronic payment terminal, by Design+Industry
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Object statement
Prototype, for Ingenico electronic payment terminal, plastic photopolymer, designed and made by Design+Industry, Balmain, New South Wales, Australia, 2002-2003
This prototype was designed by Design+Industry in 2003 for a new range of electronic payment terminals made by France-based company Ingenico International. The terminals were a redesign of the Elite 700 series designed by Design+Industry in 1995. This new range of payment terminals (NPT2) have improved features over the earlier models, such as the magnetic swipe reader at the side of the terminal and design of the printer for easier loading.

This prototype is an example of one of the earliest and most widely used rapid prototyping techniques, stereolithography. Rapid prototyping enables designers to quickly test their ideas in three dimensions and refine their ideas before they are presented to the tool maker or manufacturer. First developed in the 1980s, stereolithography builds plastic parts or objects a layer at a time by tracing a laser beam on the surface of a vat of liquid photopolymer. This material quickly solidifies wherever the laser beam strikes the surface of the liquid. Once a layer is completely traced, it is lowered a small distance into the vat and the second layer is traced on top of the first. The self-adhesive property of the material causes the layers to bond to one another and eventually form a complete three dimensional object after many layers are formed.

The electronic payment terminals are one of many banking terminals and pin pads that Design+Industry has created since Ingenico became their first client in 1987. The two companies have collaborated since then, with Design+Industry designing products in Balmain, NSW, for manufacture and sale around the world. This product is typical of the work of Design+Industry. In 2005 the group had around 60% of its business from clients outside of Australia, and was well known for its expertise in developing electronic business equipment.
This prototype was designed by Design+Industry in 2003 for a new range of counter-top electronic payment terminals for French company Ingenico International.

It was made from photopolymer using stereolithography rapid prototyping (SLA). Stereolithography uses data from a 3D computer model to build plastic parts or objects a layer at a time by tracing a laser beam on the surface of a vat of liquid photopolymer. This material quickly solidifies wherever the laser beam strikes the surface of the liquid. Once a layer is completely traced, it is lowered a small distance into the vat and the second layer is traced on top of the first. The self-adhesive property of the material causes the layers to bond to one another and eventually form a complete three dimensional object after many layers are formed.

There was a large team of people involved in the design process for this new range of terminals. The initial conceptual development was led by Richard Byers, creative manager. He created the concept sketches and life-like 3D renderings for the client to approve the design. A timber design model and prototypes using stereolithography rapid prototyping enabled the design to be tested in three dimensions. The engineering development team completed the design process of testing, tooling and implementing the product.

The terminals were a redesign of the Elite 700 series designed by Design+Industry in 1995. This new range of payment terminals (NPT2) have improved features over the earlier models, such as the magnetic swipe reader at the side of the terminal and design of the printer for easier loading.
This prototype was lent to the Museum for display in the exhibition 'Sydney designers unplugged: people, process, product' from 6 August to 9 October 2005 and subsequently donated to the Museum.

It is unknown how this prototype has been used. The model was formed from a number of parts found at the Design+Industry studio and it is unknown if all the parts were made at the same time to fit together as one complete model. These prototypes are typically disposed of once the project is complete.

Design+Industry was founded in 1987 by Murray Hunter. In 2005 it had a team of more than 35 designers and engineers and was the largest industrial design consulting group in Australia. From studios in Sydney and Melbourne, this group works on complex design and engineering projects, such as betting terminals and electronic funds transfer machines. Around 60% of its business is for clients outside Australia. In 2005 the group had begun to expand into designing furniture and homewares.

Ingenico International was founded in France in 1980 and in 2005 it had headquarters in France with 26 subsidiaries/offices worldwide. In 2005 the company sold 1.5 million payment terminals annually and was a world leader in development, manufacture and sale of electronic payment terminals.

The range of new Ingenico terminals won an Australian Design Award in 2003. Over 100 products were entered in the 2003 Australian Design Awards and 68 of these were selected as finalists. Five judging panels (in the categories of furniture design, engineering design, industrial design, textile design, and software and electronics design) recommended 56 of the finalists for a Design Mark and 25 of these for a Design Award. The products receiving Design Awards were announced at a presentation night on 9 May 2003 at the Melbourne Town Hall.

 This text content licensed under CC BY-NC.

Description
Prototype, for Ingenico electronic payment terminal, plastic photopolymer, designed and made by Design+Industry, Balmain, New South Wales, Australia, 2002-2003

Transluscent plastic stereolithography (SLA) model of body for Ingenico electronic payment terminals. It is comprised of a number of separate parts that slide together. Some parts have been hand modified using putty or annotated using pencil, pen or marker. The model is incomplete and missing the printer housing component.

Designed: Design and Industry Pty Ltd; Balmain, New South Wales

Made: Design and Industry Pty Ltd; Balmain, New South Wales; 2002 - 2003
2006/20/2

 This text content licensed under CC BY-SA.
Acquisition credit line
Gift of Design+Industry, 2006
Subjects
+ Australian product design
+ Plastics technology
+ Retail trade
+ Industrial design
+ Electronic funds transfer
+ Banking
Short persistent URL
Concise link back to this object: http://from.ph/357116
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{{cite web |url=http://from.ph/357116 |title=Prototype for electronic payment terminal, by Design+Industry |author=Powerhouse Museum |accessdate=1 August 2014 |publisher=Powerhouse Museum, Australia}}


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