Powerhouse Museum Collection Search 2.53
Category history:

Some users have reported searches being slow to complete.
Please be aware we are working to rectify this.

   

Support the Powerhouse with a tax-deductible gift

Make a donation
Audio and Visual Equipment > Car radios

+ 86/526 Radio Receiver (AM/FM) & compact ...
+ K438 Car Radios, incomplete, (4) (SB)....
+ 98/145/2 Car radio, model 189A push butt...
+ 98/146/2 Car radio, portable, model 144,...
+ B1931 Early Car Radio, no makers name - ...


Audio and Visual Equipment > Portable radios

+ 85/912 Radio, AWA model # 450P, leather ...
+ 85/914 Portable transistor radio, 'Mikro...
+ 89/1369 Transistor radio, 'Wrist Radio',...
+ 86/446 Radio Receiver, Portable Stereo F...
+ 91/85 Radio receiver and earphone, porta...
+ 91/91 Radio receiver, portable, plastic/...
+ 91/92 Radio receiver, portable, wood/pla...
+ H8283 Radio, "His Master's Voice", five ...
+ 93/65/1 Radio casing and strap, backpack...
+ K13 Transistor Radio, portable, housed i...
+ K130 Radio, 5 valve portable radiola, on...
+ K308 Radio, portable, personal, battery ...
+ K369 Portable radio, Mullard, plastic / ...
+ K389 Radio, portable, rectangular box, d...
+ K391 Radio, portable, battery operated, ...
+ K432 Radio, personal, portable, receiver...
+ K506 Radio receiver, Midget Communicatio...
+ K528 Radio, model # 450P, portable, pers...
+ K529 Radio, portable, small rectangular ...
+ K531 Radio, accessories and packaging, p...
+ 93/330/1 Portable radio and packaging, '...
+ K795 Philips Portable Transistor Radio w...
+ 94/110/1 Portable transistor radio, 'Tra...
+ 87/436 Portable Radio, service manual & ...
+ 96/43/1 Transistor radio, plastic / meta...
+ 98/145/2 Car radio, model 189A push butt...
+ 98/146/5 Portable radio, model 208 AC/DC...
+ 98/149/1 Car radio, portable, with power...
+ 98/150/1 Radio, portable, "Cadet" model ...
+ 98/150/2 Car radio, portable, model 747 ...
+ B1921 Radio, portable, valve type, batte...
+ B1985 Radio, portable, 'Tasma', personal...
+ B2140 Radio, portable, Mullard, 5 valve,...
+ B2141 Wireless Receiver; Admiralty porta...



Portable car radio

No image is publicly available for this object.

Because of the age of the Museum's collection some objects in the Museum's collection have not yet been digitised. Some images are not available for Copyright reasons. Some images are not available for cultural or privacy reasons.

Object statement
Car radio, portable, model 224 push button, plastic / metal / rubber, Ferris Bros Pty Ltd, Australia, 1965
The early experimental car sets developed by Ferris were not efficient radios, and it was not until the beginning of 1938 that Ferris began producing a radio for sale and installation. This first model was the Ferris Fultone model 56 (K438-1: Ferris Fultone model 56 identified by Mr WM Ferris, January 1998).

Ferris Bros. Pty. Ltd. expended a good proportion of resources and time on product design, technical improvement and manufacture techniques. Ferris forged strategic partnerships with component manufacturers enabling the speedier delivery of technical innovations to the market place. The trend over this period (1940-1970) was toward the production of smaller and more feature enhanced radios than their competitors. The Ferris radio equipment in the collection illustrate an impressive array of both portable and fixed auto receivers with the design emphasis variously on RF gain and selectivity, multiband coverage, push-button tuning, audio performance and so on.

One of the greatest leaps in car radio development came with the introduction of transistors. The first use of entirely transistorised circuits by Ferris was in the model 134 in 1959. The use of transistors greatly improved reception and performance by eliminating the noisy and troublesome vibrator unit (which supplied higher voltages to valve sets). Transistors also made possible a great reduction in receiver size, lengthened battery life, and receivers played instantly when switched on.

Another innovation introduced by the model 134 was its design to slip into a cradle mounted under a vehicle dashboard. Connections to the car battery, extension speaker and aerial were mounted in this cradle.

Ferris has received consumer organisation accolades for product design (see choice magazine article on Ferris model 189A push button fixed car radio - "Volumatic Eleven").

The Ferris material includes a significant sample of car radio products manufactured over three decades. Chum Ferris established what was to become Ferris Bros. Pty. Ltd. In Mosman in 1932. Initial trade was in the manufacture (hand assembled) and service of mantle and console radios. Within four years the registered company "Ferris Bros. Pty. Ltd." was formed and the major decision to manufacture car radio receivers was taken.

In 1938 Ferris began manufacturing a car radio for sale and installation.

Ferris produced their first portable car radio model 74 in 1947. Between 1947 and 1954 eight major portable car radio models were developed and manufactured.

Ferris manufactured the model 134 transistorised portable car radio in Australia in 1959. In the following years sets of this type were manufactured in the UK, on the continent and in Japan, but Ferris claims to be the first to develop the idea of an all-transistor portable car radio operating from its own dry battery and/or a car battery.

A succession of transistor models followed the model 134 through the 1960s.

Despite Ferris' moves to automate production, complete receivers manufactured in Asia would ultimately be imported for less than the cost of the parts needed to build them here.
Guglielmo Marconi (radio pioneer) was the first person to fit a radio to a car. That was in 1901 and the car was steam powered (the radio took up most of the car). It was not until the 1930s that car radios became viable, affordable and popular. In U.S.A. a "handful" of car radios sold in 1932, by 1934 annual sales in the U.S.A. soared to 1.35 million.

Around the mid 1930s in Sydney there appeared to be an unsatisfied demand for car radio.

In 1938 Ferris began producing a car radio for sale and installation. This first model was the Ferris Fultone model 56. The success of the ferris car radio product prompted the recommencement of manufacturing after the war. the model 74 was released in 1947 and until the 1969 Hawker Siddeley Electronics Ltd. buy out Ferris was an aggressive marketer and manufacturer of this product.

Ferris car radios became renowned for reliability and styling. Ferris won a substantial share of the Australian auto/home/portable market.

The fact that car radios are now manufactured as original equipment in all cars is testament to the acceptance and enjoyment of this medium by drivers of motor vehicles.

Chum Ferris was usually presented with a new model as they came off the production line. The M224 & M189A were most likely acquired in this manner. Most of the items that Chum accumulated in this way were given away to colleagues and friends over the years, these items remained with Chum.

 This text content licensed under CC BY-NC.

Description
Car radio, portable, model 224 push button, plastic / metal / rubber, Ferris Bros Pty Ltd, Australia, 1965

Ferris Model 224 push button portable car radio, Serial No. 284P83, released in 1965. Cast metal housing with a black and chrome finish. The radio has grey tuning selection buttons located at the front lower left corner and red and white function buttons in the upper right corner. A radio band selection viewing panel is located in the upper left corner. The radio has a swinging handle made from chrome.

Designed: Ferris Bros Pty Ltd;

Made: Ferris Bros Pty Ltd; Australia; 1965


Owned: Ferris, William; Australia
Marks
metal makers marks on top of object "FERRIS PORTABLE / CAR RADIO"
"FERRIS De Luxe Nine"
98/145/1
Height
170 mm
Width
225 mm
Depth
62 mm

 This text content licensed under CC BY-SA.
Acquisition credit line
Gift of Mr W M (Chum) Ferris, 1998
Subjects
+ Radio equipment
+ Communications
+ Travel
+ entertainment
Short persistent URL
Concise link back to this object: http://from.ph/161284
Cite this object in Wikipedia
Copy and paste this wiki-markup:

{{cite web |url=http://from.ph/161284 |title=Portable car radio |author=Powerhouse Museum |accessdate=27 November 2014 |publisher=Powerhouse Museum, Australia}}


Copyright
Images on this site are reproduced for the purposes of research and study only. Whilst every effort has been made to trace the Copyright holders, we would be grateful for any information concerning Copyright of the images and we will withdraw them immediately on Copyright holder's request.
Object viewed 15356 times. Parent IRN: 2126. Master IRN: 2126 Img: Flv: H:px W:px SMO: RIGHTS:.